Andy's World

On Saturday 14th May 2011, oom Manie Muller returned to the place of his birth, Compagnes Drift, for the first time since he left as an 11-year-old in 1942. 

He describes what he remembers about the Farm and particularly about the Water Mill ......

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There wasn’t enough water to test the grain cleaner last time, after I finished fitting the screens. Although there has been a heat wave here this week, I was pleased that there was enough water on this visit.

I had arranged to meet Peter and Jill Frow, with whom I’ve been in contact since the beginning of the Reichenau Mill restoration. Peter has been intimately involved with that and although their restoration is complete and the Mill is in the hands of a full time operator, he is still involved in its management. This is his sectional drawing of Reichenau Mill.

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My first job was to make a temporary hardboard lid for the short chute which feeds the grain cleaner, as last time I tested it, grain was thrown all over the upper floor! A galvanised steel cover is on order.

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Then the spout needed a ‘sock’ to direct the grain down on to the screen. Again temporary, made from a cloth wrapped around and held in place with insulation tape.

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When the Frows arrived, I went through the starting-up procedure with them and, hoping for the best, when everything was running at a good speed, I fed grain into the elevator and opened the sluice for the grain cleaner spout.

Well, to say the least, the results were disappointing! First, the grain bounced on the top screen and some was lost over the edge until I fitted a temporary metal side. Then a lot of the impurities went through the top screen. Those which did stay behind wouldn’t move on the screen, so there’s little chance that they will ‘tail over’ at the lower end. But more disappointing was the fact that the ‘clean’ grain wouldn’t move on the lower screen, unless the water wheel was running in excess of 6 RPM, at which stage the whole building shakes with the motion of the grain cleaner. Very little came out of the ‘clean’ spout, and that still had plenty of impurities mixed in.

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There was yet another surprise in store, grain started coming out of the bottom (dust only) outlet!

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Later on, more grain did start flowing out of the ‘clean’ spout, but one can see in the picture above that there are still plenty of husks in the grain. One can also see that grain is collecting on the bag under the ‘dust’ outlet at the bottom of the machine. Clearly a lot of thinking and work must still be done if we are still going to be using ‘dirty’ wheat.

Throughout the day it was great to exchange stories with Peter about our Mill restorations, each done in a different style; theirs with larger groups of volunteers and lots of materials donated through skilful ‘begging’. Both have been done with the same ‘shoe-string’ budgetary restraints, though!

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As usual, several groups of people visited and all seemed to enjoy the experience!

 Andy Selfe

9th January 2011

 

My friend Johnny Verreynne visited the Mill on Open Days, nearly four years ago, the 21st January 2007, to be precise. On that occasion he promised some screens from an old threshing machine, which, he said, would be just what we needed to restore the grain cleaner.

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The cleaner needed two grades of screen, one which would allow a grain of wheat through but nothing bigger, like husks, sticks and larger stones. Below that it needed a fine screen which no grain would go through, but through which dust would pass. Dust in this case, coming from the field as well as the threshing floor, which was often made of dung.

True to his word, on Tuesday this week, Johnny brought the screens! Although it had taken nearly four years, his timing couldn’t have been better!

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I tested the finer of the two as soon as I could during the week and found that the whole grains passed through it well with the minimum of agitation. A ‘foreigner’ would not.

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This would be the ideal screen to use on the upper level! The other screen was coarser, but would work well to support the mosquito netting I bought last week and couldn’t use for the rotary meal screen.

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After measuring carefully, I cut the finer screen to size. There were a few places which had been damaged, bound with wire or string. I removed all that and cleaned up both sides with a brass-wired cup brush on the small angle grinder.

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I used patches from the off-cut and wired them on, so that the holes aligned exactly.

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The screen could then be inserted it in the machine to test.

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The screen worked best, as with the elevator, at speeds of the water wheel over 5RPM. Soon there was little left on the screen.

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What remained consisted of husks and some sticks. There was no tendency for these to move downward on the screen; they stayed where they were, and it makes me wonder whether there might have been a blower. It was also clear that the screen needed to be very flat; probably supported.

It was necessary to use a lot of water to achieve this speed, so it was an ideal opportunity to test the chamfer I made on the launder outlet last week. It looks as though I might be able to remove the stone as I hoped.

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I removed that screen, then cut a slightly shorter screen from the coarser sheet and tested it for size. Once I was happy, I covered it with last week’s mosquito netting and fitted it and fixed it down.

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Dust must be able to pass through this, and, importantly, the grain must roll easily over it ('tail over', it's called) into the trough in the foreground and out at the spout in the right hand corner.

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I had been pondering all day how to support the flimsier top screen. I then remembered some stiff metal tubing we had been given; it’s light and strong. I think it came from the stove-element industry. With the electric rotary file it was easy to form slots in which each end of the tubes could lie with their upper edges level with the frame of the machine. The next step was to refit the top screen I’d tried out earlier. Before fitting it, I bent it slightly over the edge of a table, a bit at a time, first one way, then the opposite. This had the effect of removing kinks and bumps in the sheet.

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And there, suddenly, the grain cleaner was complete! There wasn’t enough water or time to do a proper trial; that will have to wait for next time!

I did open the short chute from the elevator that feeds it earlier, but the grain came down with such a force that it went all over the place. The open-topped spout will need a lid and some kind of sock will have to be fitted to its outlet.

A special word of thanks must go to Johnny for his kind gift of the screens; his timing was superb!

Andy Selfe

18th December 2010

 

 

Homework for this week was lining the intermediate screen with the fibreglass mosquito netting which is slightly finer than the woven aluminium fly / mosquito net I’d used for the third stage.

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Starting from the centre, I glued the mesh to the longitudinal strip, then worked outwards along the curved parts, then across the two outer longitudinal strips, pulling it taut. Once that glue had dried, I trimmed the edges for a single fold, then applied glue to the remaining strip and folded that over and stapled.

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Unable to trace aluminium strip in small quantities, I had two strips of 1.6mm galvanised steel plate cut to the same dimensions, then drilled and countersunk them.

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From the outside, this is what it looks like:

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Our friends at Mostert’s Mill in Cape Town were in action on Saturday 4th December, and we were asked if we could help with some grain as their stocks had been found to be contaminated. We had a date for a meeting on the Steam Tug Alwyn Vintcent, so it was a good opportunity to pop in on the way and deliver half a bag. With no way of measuring half a bag by weight, we had to make do by volume.

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It was great to see all our old friends on their home turf. It was a pity there was so little wind, so they were using the opportunity to do maintenance, including raising their runner stone enough to vacuum out any traces of contaminated meal.

There was no more aluminium mesh in our village hardware shop by Friday, so I stopped in at the ‘Boeremark’ in Bot River, which is an experience on its own! They had ali mesh, but when I measured it up, it was the same weave as the fibreglass mesh I’d used for the medium screen. I will have to use it for another project. I fitted the newly lined screen to the machine:

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There would be no point attaching this new mesh to screen 3, so I milled away for most of the day, and entertained about four groups of visitors. Two groups had seen the Pasella programme on television. Our fame precedes us, it seems!

There was plenty of water, so I ran with the mill pond nearly overflowing the sluice gate. The choke point was clearly the outlet of the wooden launder over the wheel at the trap door. When I’d done enough milling to last a couple of weeks, I tackled the far edge of the opening in the wooden trough, chamfering the lower edge.

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There are metal strips between the longitudinal planks, so I had to change to the hacksaw blade when I got close to them, but the Scorpion saw was the right tool for the job!

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The flow of water is already considerably better; this was just testing with the overflow from the dam. The flat stone was necessary to prevent water passing over the opening in that corner. I hope I can now remove it.

The Korog (triticale) outside was ready for cutting, so I tried my hand with the sickle.

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The sheaf on the left I found in the Mill when I got there, it’s just re-bound in period twine rather than nasty orange plastic string; the scruffy sheaf on the right is my effort with the sickle!

In Report No 130, there was a picture of a machine at the Roller Mill at Kleinplasie. We were not sure of its purpose:

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Once again, Sir Joseph Lockwood has the answer in his book ‘Flour Milling’. It is a Disc Separator. He explains that the discs revolve partly buried in the mass of grain, picking out particles small enough to enter the pockets and discharging them into catch troughs between the discs on the downward-moving side. Figure 89 shows the cross section of (a) a wheat disc, which picks up wheat but rejects oats, barley, straws, etc. and (b) a seed disc.

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Andy Selfe

11th December 2010

 

 

There was very little water in the dam, but with the last bar removed completely from the weir, there was just enough to mill and demonstrate with. That was fine, because it meant I could concentrate on the sifter, while the mill idled away in the background, needing little supervision; just topping up directly into the hopper. There definitely wasn’t enough water to drive the elevator as well!

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There was glueing and clamping to do on the frame which arrived bare. While that was drying, I stripped the very fine screen off the frame which will be our third and coarsest one. We really don’t want much to come out of the bran spout, so I used a piece of metal woven mosquito netting which should let everything except whole grains through.

But first, there was a bracket to make for the hook at the back. A piece of electrician’s ‘DIN-rail’ worked well, with one edge hammered out flat. It was only necessary to make a rectangular hole for the hook. It works so well, I’ll get some more for the other two I have to make for the middle frame. There was a crack in the wood which the bracket covers and reinforces well.

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The old screen was torn, yet I removed it carefully, as I have plans for it, to repair one of the hand-sifters. Again, I carefully removed the screen from it to use as a template to cut the saved screen.

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But that’s a job for a sewing machine, so I turned my attention back to the coarse screen’s mesh. It seems the technique is to use contact glue, squeezed straight from the tube, then wiped over the screen and frame, allowed to dry, then wiped again, at which stage, it sticks like mad!

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I trimmed the mesh a little too wide, then folded it over and applied more glue, then wiped it again. When that was dry, a row of tacks followed. Then it could be stretched and the opposite side glued, folded and tacked.

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I was then able to refit this screen and frame to the machine. The agitator just touches the screen in one place. It would have been easier to use new mesh; this piece had snagged on something and was difficult to get straight.

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The job had to be done a bit at a time, but it allowed me to progress on the machine itself. I mentioned before the bran end had got wet and mouldy at some stage, so I sanded it after removing the bran spout. I then applied the colour of wood sealer I mixed for the elevator, that being the lightest.

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While the spout was off, I cleaned that and the others under the machine as well as the legs of what looked line diesel exhaust deposit. It was hard, dry and difficult to remove. The new wood for the bearing support and tensioner on top got a coat of the same wood sealer. Now I must make a belt-guard!

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During the day I had an assistant Miller, responsible for quality control. Sophie needed to test right to the bottom of the bucket!

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She also pointed out a pruner doing some unpaid overtime in the vineyard, quite unconcerned by us. I saw him/her again as I drove out, not more than 5m from my van.

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I managed only 8kg of meal for the whole day; some was bought by visitors and one as a sample by the Chef from the large Arabella Hotel nearby, which is hosting a Beaumont Wines dinner on 3rd December.

 Andy Selfe

21st November 2010

The plan is to demonstrate the rotary sifter producing three different grades of flour. It doesn’t matter what the grades are, some very fine flour must come out of the first stage, coarser at the next stage and coarsest out of the third. Should any whole grains still be present, they must come out of the bran chute at the end.

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The first stage screen is in good order and in position. However, the second and third frames did not fit. The third had a very fine screen on it, so it must have come from another machine. The middle one had no screen at all, and had never had clips or a screen attached.

Last week, I lined the third with a coarse-weave aluminium wire mosquito net, as described in No 136. I had my worries with this screen touching the rotating agitator and it seems my concerns were justified. There were creases in the mesh, and after a short time, the mesh had worn through in two places.

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I will need to buy another screen without creases, folds and snags and start again. This time, I’ll use staples instead of tacks on the curved section. I then concentrated on the frame for the middle section.

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It had got wet and mouldy at some time and had distorted. A wipe-over with an oxalic acid solution brightened the wood up considerably. One ‘bow’ had rotted a bit and splayed out to more than its correct diameter, so I applied cold glue to the damaged section and left it to dry under compression.

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The electricians’ DIN-rail was so successful last week for the sockets for the hooks at the back that I bought some more and before long there were two on this frame.

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In for a penny…. I made the hooks for the over-centre clips at the front out of the same material. The frame required a lot of trimming with a sanding disc before it fitted the machine, but perseverance won in the end!

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This frame is now ready for the intermediate mesh to be attached. During the week I managed to get some fibreglass woven mesh, a slightly narrower weave than the aluminium mesh.

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The fibreglass mesh has 31 gaps per 60mm, so averages out at 1.93mm per square, compared with 23 gaps for the aluminium mesh or 2.6mm per square. There is enough difference to demonstrate the machine.

The torn fine mesh removed from the third frame was gainfully employed to repair the small fine hand sifter.

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The old torn and rotten screen on the left and the much finer mesh on the right.

Using meal from last Saturday, which was slightly damp coming from the fridge, it was astonishing what went through that fine screen!

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The big pile has gone through, the smaller heap to the right stayed behind, about 20%. Maybe I’m milling too finely?

For some time now, I have been considering repairing the clasp-arm spokes of the pit-wheel. This could easily be original and 200 years old. Only to of the eight ends have rotted like this; the Mill must have flooded at some time and these were at the bottom.

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I have some old Oregon of exactly the right dimensions, removed from an old Railway cottage.

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The trick will be to splice new pieces in without removing the wheel!

Andy Selfe

28th November 2010

 

 

 

 

There were two woodworking projects to do at home in the week before Open Gardens. One was to make a cover for half of the hopper of the main elevator, so that the ever larger number of people wishing to climb the stairs to look at the Vitruvian Mill working, have somewhere to stand at the bottom and so that dirt from their shoes doesn’t go into the hopper.

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It’s nothing special and it’s not made of Oregon, but it works. It will be nice to cover the other half for when the Mill is not in use. After applying some more Power Putty epoxy to potential leaks in the hopper, the elevator performed perfectly all weekend. It was a little reluctant to throw out at the top at speeds less than 4 RPM on the water wheel, but it still does work at that speed.

The other project was the lay-shaft for the ‘new’ rotary screen or sifter, which after being ‘dared’ by Jayne, I was determined to have at least turning this weekend. A shaft and two pillow blocks were bought and I scratched out a flat belt pulley for one end and a vee pulley for the other, the flat being half the diameter of the vee, in order to double the speed. I didn’t want to make a steel support bracket for the pillow blocks so settled for wooden dovetail slides.

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This assembly was in position on Saturday morning, fixed down by evening and on Sunday morning. I brought a vee belt from home and we made up a flat belt, moved the ‘spare’ pulley on the line shaft, which until now hasn’t had anything connected to it, a few inches and the machine was running!

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There is still plenty to do on this machine to get it working, but at least its rotor is now turning!

As usual, there was a constant stream of visitors, and I was lucky to have the assistance all weekend of Leroy, the main tractor driver from the farm. He was extremely helpful and did all the sifting, weighing and bagging, and a lot more besides. He is keen to be an understudy, and works on Saturdays on his vegetable plot nearby so can probably lend a hand more often. We milled 45 kg over the weekend and most was sold.

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On Saturday morning a group of cyclists came past, and all weekend, the nearby sausage tree (Kigelia pinnata), which relies on our bats apart from sunbirds and insects for pollination, was in full bloom. The scent of the flowers was overpowering!

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It isn’t meant to grow in our climate, but maybe that is changing to suit the tree!

Andy Selfe

1st November 2010

 

With the extra load from the working elevator, we’re noticing we need more power, and therefore, more water. The amount of water is governed by the sliding gates in the weir at the dam, added to any overflow (which diminishes as the water below it is consumed during the day); the height of the sluice gate and the opening in the wooden launder directly over the water-wheel. All these were arrived at by pure guesswork, and we’re only now noticing limitations.

I can easily make more slides in the weir. Only two of the five sections have slides built in. I can easily add an extension to the height of the sluice. On the Sunday of the second Open Gardens weekends, we ran as close to the sluice overflowing as we ever have.

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Improvements to the flow between this pond and the top end of the launder could also be made; it can be seen in the picture above that the water level in the pond is considerably higher than that in the launder. However, the main limiting factor is the opening over the water-wheel. The trap-door cannot open any further; as it is, it touches four consecutive buckets as they pass. I leave it like this; it’s a subconscious reminder of the rate the wheel is turning at.

I suspect the next move will be to modify the opening in the wooden launder. The trap-door is longer than the opening, so the next move is to lengthen the opening, probably streamlining the angle of the far edge to assist the flow downwards.

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I tried to keep count of the number of visitors, but it was impossible. Every time, I think the figure reaches 100 on these Open Days. Perhaps it’s not that many, but it puts a strain on the vocal cords, particularly with all the machinery running there’s a considerable hum in the Mill! Each day of the Open Gardens we milled and sold about 25kg of Stone Ground Meal, in addition to the bread which was being baked every day, made from the meal from the previous Saturday.

The ‘new’ sifter is causing a stir! It’s a large, imposing machine and while I doubt that the quantities of meal which we produce will ever justify its actual use, it’s an interesting addition to the range of machines in the Mill, and I feel there would have been one originally.

There wasn’t much time during the Open Gardens weekends to progress with its restoration so I hoped to get a lot further on the following Saturday. No such luck! A constant stream of visitors, one with a sizeable order phoned in in advance for meal, kept me busy milling and talking. A birthday party was being held at the Main House and the guests streamed down after a delicious lunch, to which I was invited, to experience the Mill.

I carefully sanded away at the frames for the screens until I had two of the three fitted:

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There’s a catch missing at the rear of this one; luckily there’s one to copy from. The mesh of the screen is much too fine and needs replacing.

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This is the 1st (cake flour) screen, which is still a bit difficult to hook up at the back before swinging it up to clip it in at the front. There was a lot of scrubbing out to do inside the machine to remove cobwebs, old flour and dust. The middle frame has no catches at all, so they will have to be made, and there’s no mesh on that either. I have brought the frames home and hope to progerss further before my next visit!

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On the night of Monday 8th November, I was asked to give a talk on the restoration so far, at a meeting of the local Bot River Aesthetics Association. I prepared a disc of about 50 photos and gave a slide show which helped the audience envisage the set-up, which, for some reason, the locals hardly ever visit!

Andy Selfe

14th November 2010

There was an order from Zest Catering for 18kg of meal for each of the forthcoming Open Gardens Weekends, so I decided to do both batches together. I have been looking for an opportunity to put bigger volumes of grain through the elevator.

But first, there was a surprise! The rotary sieve bought at least a year ago from Joos Solms in Champagne Valley, Natal had arrived! We heard about the availability of the machine through Joos’ involvement in the Reichenau Mill project.

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The machine needs attention to the outside woodwork at the bran end particularly, and it must be connected up to be driven from the shaft above, to run at a speed of 280 to 300 RPM. Also, the frames of the screens don’t seem to fit quite correctly and one has no screen, another is torn, so some work is needed there. Later in the day I found the handle for the left hand flap inside the machine and glued and screwed that back on.

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I haven’t wanted to add any other machinery to the Mill house, but I feel sure there was such a machine and there are marks in the concrete floor next to the Stamford Mill, where some kind of machine was bolted down. Putting a machine there would be too much in the way, so this corner is ideal, under the line shafting. It can be driven, through a lay-shaft, from the unused pulley above.

While the water wheel was running at 6 RPM, I measured the speed of the line-shafting at 50 RPM. Theoretically, the pinion shaft running off the pit wheel should be running at 6 RPM times 88 (cogs on the pit-wheel) divided by 11 (Teeth on the pinion) = 48 RPM. It has a pulley of 610mm diameter and that drives a pulley on the line shaft of 500mm diameter, which should make the line-shaft turn at 58.56 RPM. The ‘spare’ pulley above (but not in line with) the sieve input pulley has a diameter of 600 and that on the sieve is 225mm. If we work on the theoretical speed of 58.56 RPM, and if these two were to be directly coupled, the sieve would turn at 58.56 RPM multiplied by 600mm divided by 225mm = 156 RPM; about half speed. So any lay-shaft must have an input pulley half the diameter of the output. Somehow it must be possible to set the tension of both belts. There is a bracket on the top of the machine which can be used, where an electric motor was previously mounted.

The tests with the elevator weren’t entirely without a problem! I was pouring grain into the hopper, it was being lifted and thrown out at the top, despite the water wheel turning at only 5 RPM, yet the quantities didn’t seem to tally! There could only be one reason, a ‘leak’ at the base of the elevator. I raised the crawl-space cover, and not entirely surprisingly, found a big pile of grain on the floor!

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Also interesting was the ‘crop’ of sprouted wheat from previous spills, growing entirely in the dark, looking like strands of yellow plastic! Luckily, I had vacuumed this space out recently and it was possible to scoop most of it out. The last batch which needed sweeping together, went into the sieve I use for the meal to let the dust fall through to waste.

The problem I had overlooked when I made and attached the base about two years ago is that grain flows like water. Any gap, even if it faces upwards, will ‘leak’ grain. A handy wedge was lying around which was just right for the main gap, and after some more tests showing that the corners leaked, I mixed up some epoxy putty and filled them.

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Once this problem was corrected, the elevator worked well, and for the first time, it could fill the Vitruvian Mill’s hopper faster than it was emptying.

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There are losses from this delivery chute, some grains jump over the sides, so I measured for ‘greedy-boards’ to be made of light galvanised sheet to raise the sides.

Another test I did while the wheel was running at 6 RPM was to check the speed of the Stamford Mill. It was running at 300 RPM exactly. The now unfortunately torn and lost instructions stated it should run at 450 RPM. This would require the water wheel to run at 9 RPM which is out of the question! By about 7 RPM the whole Mill-house starts to shake uncomfortably. This now requires a major re-think. Either the driving pulley, which at 910mm in diameter is the biggest in the Mill, would have to be increased to 1365mm, or the already very small driven pulley on the Mill would have to lose 2/3 of its diameter. If so, then the engine will run it too fast!

When all the grain was used up, 38kg had been milled during the day, and a total of 1½kg out of this bag could not be accounted for. There is normally a small loss out of any 50kg bag, so considering the losses incurred while the elevator has been tested, that’s not bad!

Just before leaving (I had to wait until the water stopped flowing!), I fitted the hand rail to the wall above the launder. It’s easy enough to walk in the launder when it’s dry, but walking on the edges when the water is flowing is like tight-rope walking over a turning water-wheel!

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I showed five groups of visitors around during the day. They all seemed to leave suitably impressed seeing the Mill in full swing!

Andy Selfe

24th October 2010

With Open Gardens weekends at the end of the month, I wanted to make sure the Elevator was working properly for the occasion. While I thought before that we’d only use the elevator on special occasions, it’s working so well that I think we’ll use it all the time! One of the concerns was that rodents might be a problem, but natural controls seem to have cured that problem completely. There are often grains lying on the floor from week to week from the experiments with the elevator, and nothing seems to be touched!

So I brought a long list of chores and materials which I tackled before even thinking of starting up the Mill. There was a cover to make for the inspection hole in the descending chute at the top, a hand-rail to get ready to put up over the water wheel and I had made up a shallow tray for sliding in under the elevator base for catching grains if it does have to be cleaned out.

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Next, I wanted to finish lining the lower portion of the delivery chute to the Vitruvian Mill with galvanised sheet, using tacks as the originals were fitted.

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Then the lid, just a metal lining for the meantime. Something else was fed from this chute which we have not fathomed yet. A gap can be seen on the left, now covered by the galvanised strip. I don’t want to interfere with the woodwork as clues might be lost. One has to remember that some machine stood next to the Stamford Mill; one can see the marks in the concrete of the floor.

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Next, I was losing grain between the descending trunk of the elevator and the top of the delivery chute, so with an offcut from last week, I made and fitted a lining over the join. The grain will be thrown against this face, so it will help for wear, too.

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I also brought along steel bracing for the grain cleaner. The machine rocks considerably anyway, but the added forces from the agitation of the final chute to the Vitruvian Mill seem to rock it from side to side too much. I have experimented with a piece of wood clamped to the front with success, so these steel braces are a more permanent solution. Now the whole floor rocks!

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In fact, the chute works so well now, that I might experiment with a reduction in the stroke, which could be done very easily.

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The last job, before testing was fitting the cover. Then I could start the Mill up and try it all out!

Remembering to first have the elevator running before adding the grain to avoid choking the base again, I got the wheel turning at about 5 RPM and threw half a bucket of grain into the elevator hopper. The sluice at the bottom is just open a tiny amount, yet the grain flows down fairly easily.

The window I fitted in the front of the trunking mainly for the benefit of visitors has an unintended advantage! While some grain was being thrown into the delivery chute, I was able to watch the balance of the grain falling back down the descending trunk. I gradually increased the water supply, and disconnected some load (throwing off the belt to the Gutmann, for instance), to increase the water wheel speed.

The effect was dramatic! With one eye on the window in the trunk and the other on the rev-counter, the speed went just over 6 RPM and there was suddenly no more grain falling in the descending trunk and the base was empty! I only milled about 4kg; the purpose was just to test the elevator, but as expected for a long time, the elevator has helped us to find out what the minimum speed for the water wheel should be!

So now, exactly four years into the restoration, we can say the elevator is working properly! Next is the grain cleaner, and hopefully Joos Solms will soon bring down from Natal, the rotary screen we plan to add to the line-up of machinery, as it seems strange that there isn’t one. He has a delivery in our area this month.

Before closing up, I gave the new wood of the elevator delivery network a coat of varnish, and measured up for a cover for the elevator hopper.

Andy Selfe

10th October 2010

 

 

 

 

 

 

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